Tagged: price-fixing

It Takes Two to Tango: Two-Sided Markets and the Appeals in Cartes Bancaires and MasterCard

By Hans Vedder

The Court has recently decided on the appeals in two seminal cases: MasterCard MIF (MasterCard) and Groupement des Cartes Bancaires (CB). Both cases result from Commission decisions that found Article 101 TFEU to have been infringed by the decisions taken within those schemes with regard to fees that form part of the working of these payment systems. To understand both cases it is necessary to first set out the background to the MasterCard and CB systems. After that we will examine the procedure and finally the judgments themselves. This will reveal essentially three interesting issues:

  1. the object-effect dichotomy,
  2. the relation between the exclusion of competitors and the object category, and
  3. the possibility to take into account redeeming features.

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The principle of fault in EU competition law: C-681/11 Schenker & Co and others

 In some American movies prison dialogues often go like this: Question: ‘What are you in for?’ Answer ‘Lawyer screwed me, I’m innocent!’ In C-681/11 Schenker & Co and others this was more or less the defence a couple of Austrian transport companies came up with after being fined for infringing competition rules. Those companies had received some dubious legal advice which effectively gave them the green light for a price fixing agreement. The case contains some pretty interesting questions on whether undertakings can be fined if they have not culpably infringed competition law. In other words, if companies have taken the necessary precautions to assure themselves that their conduct was legal, can they still be fined because the authorities made a different assessment? The particularly noteworthy feature of this case are the different approaches taken by the CJEU (focussing more on what people should know about the law) and the AG (focussing more on what people can expect from legal experts and authorities).

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